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August 26, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

Where will the Dining Room Pop Up Next?

Saturday, August 25, 2012 was The Dining Rooms last night as a pop-up at Vesper in the Shelborne South Beach.

It has been an amazing run at Vesper, and we are excited to have had a chance to pop up in such a hot neighborhood. Our summer fling at Vesper has left us with many memories, and we want to thank the Shelborne for making us part of their family.

Vesper will be launching its new inviting and casual South Beach concept October 5th. The menu will bring new gastronomic items that redefine the art of good eating at good prices.. And yes we will have our famous Fried Zeppoli’s.

This is not it for The Dining Room. Where will we pop-up next? Send us a Tweet if you have any suggestions! Think Brickell..We are in the mist of looking for a new neighborhood to call home.
For now, our team is working on a pop-up bar, The Blacksmith. It will be located at The Well (444 West 41st Street) The Blacksmith will be poppin' up on Wednesday nights in October. The venue will feature artisanal bottle service, spirits, and an exciting small plates menu by no other then, Chef Horacio Rivadero. Buffalo Brown’s live band will perform a variety of jazzy-rock favorites. Stay tuned for more details.

The Dining Room at Vesper would like to thank you all for joining us this summer! Both restaurants are excited to start the season off with a big bang.

We would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks,

Maria Lieberman
The Dining Room at Vesper
1801 Collins Ave
Miami Beach, Fl 33139
305-397-8444
www.DiningRoomMiami.com
Twitter:@DiningRoomPopUp
August 6, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

Ocean Drive: The Dining Room at Vesper Pops Up

There are big changes afoot in the Shelborne’s former Vesper Brasserie kitchen.

SoFi’s The Dining Room has left its Washington Avenue space in favor of a pop-up at the Shelborne South Beach—replacing Vesper Brasserie. Now called The Dining Room at Vesper, the restaurant focuses on small plates and market-driven fare by chef Horacio Rivadero. Fans of the SoFi predecessor will be happy to find an extended wine list, alfresco seating, and new cocktails. Opening just in time to participate in Miami Spice, the restaurant will serve a special three-course menu ($39) through September. Menu options range from tamarind-glazed pork belly with blue potato purée to sweet potato gnocchi with beet tomato sauce and goat cheese foam. The grand finale? A milky caramel sponge cake with mango and apple granita. The Dining Room at Vesper will be open Tuesday to Saturday, from 6 PM to midnight. 1801 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-397-8444

Read more at http://oceandrive.com/channels/home-page/insights#Bx1Y2dmEqlQF8zu5.99

Read more at http://oceandrive.com/channels/home-page/insights#Bx1Y2dmEqlQF8zu5.99

August 1, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

Eater.com: The Dining Room Invades Vesper Brasserie in Shelborne South Beach


The popular SoFi eatery, The Dining Room, is leaving its cramp spot at 413 Washington in favor of "popping up" at the Shelborne's Vesper Brasserie. Looking to increase the size of his restaurant, The Dining Room's owner, Brian Lieberman, reached out to friend of 25 years and owner of the Shelborne South Beach, Keith Menin, for a new collaboration. Along with more tables, the pop-up will provide The Dining Room a full liquor bar, event space, outdoor terrace dining, and "hopefully never having to turn away a customer due to our size." The first day of the new Dining Room at the Shelborne will be August 1.

The Dining Room pop-up at the Vesper Brasserie will be open Tuesday through Saturday from 6 p.m. to midnight.

Click here to view the full article on Miami.Eater.com

August 1, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

The Dining Room moves out of Washington Ave. space to become pop-up at The Shelborne

From Miami.com:

Diminutive dining hot spot leaves SoFi in need of more space, shacking up at The Shelborne's restaurant, Vesper Brasserie

Now here's an interesting transformation. The Dining Room, a locals and critical fave in South Beach's SoFi 'hood is moving out and becoming a full time pop-up restaurant through the end of next season. Says The Dining Room's Maria Lieberman, whose husband Zack and brother-in-law Brian are the restaurant's owners,  "After the overwhelming amount of patrons flooding our tiny little space, we realized it was time to move on to a larger venue." The new space not only has more room, but a full liquor bar and, says Liberman, the opportunity to "hopefully never having to turn away a customer due to our size."

The move to Shelborne isn't as strange as some may think. Shelborne South Beach owner Keith Menin and The Dining Room's co-owner Brian Lieberman, are BFFs. Brian Lieberman, incidentally, also own Ola, where The Dining Room's executive chef Horacio Rivadero splits his time at Menin's other hotel, The Sanctuary.  All the same menu items will be at the newly named The Dining Room at Vesper along with an exctended wine list.

The restaurant's first day as a pop-up is Wednesday, August 1.  Among the dishes on the restaurant's Miami Spice menu: shrimp ceviche with citrus-tomato water, scallions, red onion, cilantro and lime popcorn and lamb Milanese wiuth baby arugula, pine nuts, roasted beets and lemon goat cheese vinaigrette.

As for why the restaurant is calling itself a pop-up when it's seemingly taking over a space permanently, Lieberman tells us it's no oxymoron and that, "It's not permanent ....yet ! It will be a pop up through the end of season and then Brian and Keith will sit down and reevaluate."

The Dining Room Pop-Up at Vesper Brasserie will be open Tuesday- Saturday from 6pm-midnight.

Click here to view the original article on Miami.com

August 1, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

The Dining Room Closes, Re-Opens Tomorrow As "Pop-Up at Vesper"

                         

The Dining Room closed its petite South Beach venue last week and has decided to move in with relatives until it finds a place of its own. Sort of. Vesper Brasserie in the Shelbourne Hotel will be giving its space up to The Dining Room, which starting tomorrow evening will become "The Dining Room Pop-Up at Vesper Brasserie."

Maria Lieberman of The Dining Room chalked up the move to the need for a "bigger location," but there's another new angle to the new locale: The Dining Room now gets a full liquor license and outdoor terrace space.

The Dining Room co-owners Brian Lieberman and Keith Menin will see how the pop-up progresses, and then "reevaluate" things at the end of summer.

The Dining Room Pop-Up at Vesper Brasserie's hours are dinner Tuesday through Sunday, 6 p.m. to midnight.

Click here to view the original article on Miami New Times

A Modern Bistro in Miami Beach

A Modern Bistro in Miami Beach
June 13, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

Best Intimate Restaurant on Miami New Times

The Dining Room won Best Intimate Restaurant of 2012!


— I'm so glad we could get together at this cozy little 24-seater for our tête-à-tête.

— You can thank my shrink; he told me to quit having intimate dinners for two unless there was another person around.

— It's such a charming room, dimly lit with a chandelier and flickering candles, decorated family photos on the walls. It makes me think I'm dining at home. And the service is so personal; they really seem to care about each diner. Shall we start with a drink?

— I thought you'd never ask.

— Paul Goerg Blanc De Blancs champagne is served by the glass. Let's each have one and share a crispy duck confit salad with grilled apricots ($15) while we decide what to eat.

— If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and talks like a duck, it probably needs more time in the microwave.

— Ha-ha, very funny. But I was hoping we could cut down on the jokes tonight and have a serious, personal discussion. First let's decide the menu. The flavors are intense here. A lot of the ingredients used by chefs Horacio Rivadero and Christian Alvarez are locally sourced and organic.

— I like organic farmers. They till it like it is.

— The vanilla butternut squash soup ($11), by the way, is to die for. Plus I've had the pan-roasted chicken with fingerling potatoes and morel mushrooms ($22). It's divine.

— I'm just wondering: Do chickens think rubber humans are funny?

— Can't you be serious for a second? I mean, that's really what I wanted to discuss with you tonight. I can't go on like this. We come to this most romantic of places and all you can do is make inane wisecracks. We're through. Do you understand? I mean, we'll have our meal first, of course — I'm not giving that up for you — but then that's it. And believe me, I will never go out with a comedy writer again. Never!

— So two cannibals are eating a clown. One says to the other: "Does this taste funny to you?"

Click here to view the original article on Miami New Times

May 15, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

Examiner.com: Dinner for Mad Men in Magic City

"Magic City", the Starz network's answer to "Mad Men", may not be rating high with viewers here in New York City, but the city where it takes place still lures Manhattanites to its beaches, hotels, restaurants and nightclubs. South Beach, the neighborhood in the city of Miami Beach, Florida, that lies between Biscayne Bay and the Atlantic Ocean, is the yin to Manhattan's yang, only more concentrated. Where "Mad Men" is unique to Manhattan, with its sophisticated professionals sitting in sleek office aeries, "Magic City" captures the high key colors of Miami's epic hotels and sun kissed denizens. "Mad Men" and "Magic City" are period shows, set in the late 50's and early 60's, but both are identified closely with all that eternally defines the city where each is set.

Collins Avenue and Ocean Drive, two main promenades of South Beach, offer up a tropical kaleidoscope of luxury and decadence that New Yorkers have long since become inured to. These two arteries that run parallel to the ocean are dense with elegant hotels, trendy boutiques, and the endless parade of barely clothed models, European jet-setters and wet and wild tourists that make it all come alive. If you took the neighborhoods of Soho, Tribeca, and that part of Madison Avenue that runs from 57th Street to 86th Street, and set them on a palm lined beach, you would have South Beach. That, and the fact that Miami International Airport is a mere 2 1/2 hour plane ride from any major NYC airport, and you have the perfect get away for New Yorkers.

"Magic City", the Starz network's answer to "Mad Men", may not be rating high with viewers here in New York City, but the city where it takes place still lures Manhattanites to its beaches, hotels, restaurants and nightclubs. South Beach, the neighborhood in the city of Miami Beach, Florida, that lies between Biscayne Bay and the Atlantic Ocean, is the yin to Manhattan's yang, only more concentrated. Where "Mad Men" is unique to Manhattan, with its sophisticated professionals sitting in sleek office aeries, "Magic City" captures the high key colors of Miami's epic hotels and sun kissed denizens. "Mad Men" and "Magic City" are period shows, set in the late 50's and early 60's, but both are identified closely with all that eternally defines the city where each is set.

Collins Avenue and Ocean Drive, two main promenades of South Beach, offer up a tropical kaleidoscope of luxury and decadence that New Yorkers have long since become inured to. These two arteries that run parallel to the ocean are dense with elegant hotels, trendy boutiques, and the endless parade of barely clothed models, European jet-setters and wet and wild tourists that make it all come alive. If you took the neighborhoods of Soho, Tribeca, and that part of Madison Avenue that runs from 57th Street to 86th Street, and set them on a palm lined beach, you would have South Beach. That, and the fact that Miami International Airport is a mere 2 1/2 hour plane ride from any major NYC airport, and you have the perfect get away for New Yorkers.

A New Yorker in any city is going to be concerned about the quality of food on offer, and in the last ten years South Beach has seen its stock rise significantly in this area, drawing brand name chefs from all over the world. A town once famed for its variety of the Cuban sandwich and the perfect stone crab claw now boasts a haute dining scene that delivers satisfaction to the most demanding palate. One of these restaurants is The Dining Room, situated one block over from Collins on Washington Avenue. This is a family affair, and that is one of the things that makes eating here so special. Owners Maria, Zack, and Brian Lieberman's roots go way back in Miami. The family photos on the walls of this elegant and intimate space are a testament to their status of true native, much like the hotel owner, Ike Evans, of "Magic City."

Executive Chef, Horacio Rivadero, was mentored by Douglas Rodriguez, a South Florida culinary celebrity, and star of The Dining Room's sister restaurant, Ola, in South Beach's Sanctuary Hotel. Rodriguez is acclaimed worldwide as the Godfather of Nuevo Latino Cuisine, so the pedigree is profound. One of the highlights of eating at The Dining Room is the opportunity to observe Rivadero and Chef de Cuisine, Cristian Alvarez, cooking just feet from the front door. Imagine eating out on a reality tv show, without the petulant drama, and this is the vibe of the place. You can watch Alvarez prepping the Filet Mignon Churrasco or pouring the Fish and Seafood soup into deep bowls right near your table. A mini cast iron skillet is set on the counter, which holds a crispy confit of pork belly. This tender and succulent piece of meat sits in a carrot cardomono puree, surrounded by cauliflower and brussel sprouts in a soy demi glaze. And this is an appetizer!

On a recent night at The Dining Room, Deborah and Vic Van Cleve were feasting on Striped Bass with pistachio pesto with grilled white asparagus, Serrano ham, baby arugula, and fava beans. The Van Cleves live in South Beach and are regulars, dropping into The Dining Room on average of three nights a week. Their daughter, Jennifer, a psychologist visiting from Washington D.C., was with them. A good rule of thumb for any tourist looking for the best spot to eat in an unfamiliar city is to go where the locals hang. The Dining Room is a treasure to the locals of South Beach, which they probably would rather keep to themselves. But considering its top spot on Trip Advisor for restaurants in Miami, the secret is out.

View the original article on Examiner.com
May 5, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

Dining Room on Dinnerreviews.com

This is one of those restaurants that you just have to experience. Whoever said size matters has never been to The Dining Room. I’m sure all the “small” clichés have been over-used by now, so I won’t go there. Where I will go is that this is an excellent restaurant, and intimate is the description that comes to my mind first. Owners Maria, Zack and Brian Lieberman have brought the term Family Affair to a whole new level! Some of the freshest, most well thought out food was served to my Celebrity Guest and Social Astronaut Amanda Corbett and I on our recent visit. Here is what went down.

The Dining Room’s food is created and cooked by Executive Chef Horacio Rivadero, and simply shouts, “I was just made a few seconds ago”!

Just look up from your table and you’ll see Chef Rivadero and Chef de Cuisine Cristian Alvarez cooking just a few feet from the front door.

Even though Chef Rivadero’s mentor is Celebrity Chef and South Florida culinary pioneer, Douglas Rodriguez, he is making a giant splash while paving his own legacy today at The Dining Room. Less is so much more here. The uncomplicated but well planned menu features only seven main courses.Owner Zack Lieberman says sometimes they have off the menu specials as well, but what is offered is sufficient in my opinion. There are also ten Little Plates at the beginning of the menu, many of which could easily be enjoyed as a main course. Wine list is great too!

We were feeling adventurous as usual, and The Dining Room was happy to fashion our gastronomic escapade for us. Soon our palates were awakened with a perfectly chilled Cobia Ceviche. Gorgeous Florida Cobia marinated in yuzu lime juice, red onions, cilantro and aji limo (this fruity tasting Peruvian pepper is a spicy secret ingredient from the Andes), and finished with grapefruit sorbet. I can assure you that this was fantastic, fresh and full of flavor…just as Zack had promised.

This dish awoke our palates as it is designed to do, and left us yearning for more of Chef Rivadero’s culinary creations. We would not be disappointed. As our taste buds were still whistling fresh from the ceviche, more edible culinary ideas from the mind of the chef appeared before us. We were salivating over Grilled Calamari Salad, as well as Scallops wrapped in Serrano Ham, with foie gras, sherry sauce and herbed crostini. Mingling with crunchy red radishes and watercress, the lightly grilled squid in the Calamari Salad is dressed in citrus-chili glaze and drizzled with Kalamata aioli!

Reading these ingredients should give you an idea of the thought and effort that goes into Chef Rivadero’s menu, but tasting is truly believing! These two dishes were stunningly delicious. The Dining Room’s scallop recipe pays homage to the age-old combination of ham and scallops in this, a house specialty. These beautiful bivalves were perfectly plump and cooked only until slightly translucent inside. The flavor combinations on this plate are something I’ll remember for a long time, and I will compare future chef’s scallop recipes to this one. That’s how good it is!

We’re enjoying some New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc as we move into main courses, all chosen for us by Zack and the chef. Striped Bass with pistachio pesto, grilled white asparagus, Serrano ham, baby arugula and fava beans is up next.

The skin on this filleted fish was delightfully crispy, adding just the right amount of crunch to go along with the flavor combinations in the preparation. We also loved the Filet Mignon Churrasco, simply served with heirloom tomatoes and blue cheese salad, finished with a Malbec chimichurri. This piece of meat was juicy, full of amazing flavor and went great with a glass of Merlot.

We were full, but still managed to sample Crispy Braised Pork, made with green mustard, white bean puree and topped with pickled red radishes. A very hearty taste and every bit as good as all the other dishes we tried. Attention: There is a great chef at work here, and he makes creative food with love!

Before we could protest, an exciting little dessert arrived. Looking like a Baked Alaska from the old days, The Dining Room’s version is called Baked Patagonia. Check it out – Pistachio cake, dulce de leche ice cream, Italian meringue, and passion fruit berry sauce. The meringue had been toasted to perfection, and Amanda and I didn’t stop until it was gone. We will be trying the Key Lime Tart with Vanilla Ice Cream and the Chocolate Bomb on our next visit. Speaking of “The Bomb”…The Dining Room in Miami is just that! One of the best dinners I have had this year. Check this gastronomic gem out soon, and tell them Tom House and DinnerReviews.com© sent you!

Click here to view the full article on Dinnerreviews.com
April 25, 2012 Posted by admin in Press

Horacio Rivadero's Tips on Cooking Like an Inspired Restaurant Chef: MiamiNewTimes.com

Sick and tired of those dull, home-cooked dinners of buttered pasta? Instead, try following the advice of Horacio Rivadero, executive chef of The Dining Room in South Beach. With his advice, you can develop an inspired recipe of your very own.

Chef Rivadero believes that truly excellent dishes showcase fresh ingredients, evoke memories, and are a perfect balance of flavors and textures. Feeling overwhelmed? Don't worry. He has also shared one of his great seasonal recipes, featuring Serrano Wrapped Scallops with Yellow Corn Sauce, Corn Pico de Gallo and Black Trumpet Mushrooms, for those nights when you need some inspiration directly from the chef himself.

To start building an excellent recipe, Chef Horacio starts off with fresh ingredients. Menus and dishes cannot be static, because they are completely dependent on the availability of ingredients. He seeks out local produce and makes it a point to mention that the locavore movement is not just a fad. It's about a commitment to quality and freshness. To keep up with produce, the menu at The Dining Room evolves according to the season.

At home, try keeping an open mind when you head to the grocery store or farmer's market. Let the produce decide what's for dinner and not the latest suggestion from your favorite Food Network host.

Once stocked up on freshness, Rivadero considers influences, like those sweet memories of the basil garden his mother kept in the backyard during his childhood in Córdoba, Argentina. He begins to brainstorm about the pairings of these ingredients, considering cultural, personal or gastronomical inspiration. In the case of the featured corn-filled recipe, Rivadero thought back to the scallop and corn chowders he savored on a trip to New England.

Rivadero also thinks about balance. He stresses that a properly executed dish showcases both sweetness and saltiness. When you are dreaming up your dinner, think about the individual flavors of each ingredient. Remember that a hint of acid brightens up the palate. A mixture of raw, cooked and crispy textures makes flavors more compelling. Try to add different elements of creaminess, crunchiness and fluffiness.

For the recipe below, Chef Horacio mixes sweet, creamy corn with raw, fresh corn. The jalapeño adds a hint of spice. He adds trumpet mushrooms, fortified in sherry, for a deep earthiness that compliments the salty jamón serrano. The scallops are seared to achieve a crispy, browned crust. The variety of flavors, textures and aromas keeps the dish interesting with every bite.

Try to keep in mind that every single ingredient has a purpose, even garnishes. If you dine at The Dining Room, you will never spot a plate superfluously dusted with minced parsley on the edges. You will also never see arrangements of flowers or inedible foods atop an entree. Rivadero believes that garnishes should not only be edible, but they should take part in the entire balance of the dish.

Basically, don't try to impress your guests with dishes loaded with minced herbs. If the garnishes can fly away and disappear with a gust of wind with no harm to your dish, think about another option.

If you're still not feeling too inspired by childhood memories or bountiful produce, try out this recipe which showcases fresh, sweet corn. Chef Horacio uses corn from Homestead in his rendition, which reaches its seasonal peak in the months of April and May. Serve it as an appetizer at your next dinner party and your guests will think that you too are an inspired restaurant chef.
dining_room.JPG
Serrano Wrapped Scallops with Yellow Corn Sauce, Corn Pico de Gallo and Black Trumpet Mushrooms
Serves 4, as an appetizer
Note: The yellow corn sauce, the corn pico de gallo and the mushrooms can all be prepped in advance. The serrano wrapped scallops can also be kept in the fridge for a few hours, so you can play graceful host and just cook off the scallops and warm the sauce right before dinner time.

Ingredients

Serrano Wrapped Scallops:
8 jumbo scallops
8 slices of jamón serrano
2 tablespoons of unsalted butter

Yellow Corn Sauce:
2 tablespoons of unsalted butter
2 cups of chopped Spanish onion
6 ears of fresh sweet yellow corn
1 tablespoon of sugar
1 teaspoon of turmeric
Salt, to taste
1 bay leaf
1 stick of celery
4 cups of water

Corn Pico de Gallo:
2 cups of fresh sweet yellow corn (about 4 ears of corn)
2 tablespoons of chives
1 red jalapeño, minced
1 1/2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
Salt to taste

Black trumpet mushrooms:
2 oz dried black trumpet mushrooms (rehydrated in water, then pat dried) *
1/4 cup sherry
Micro celery, as an optional garnish

* If you can't find black trumpet mushrooms, Chef Horacio recommends enoki mushrooms as a substitute.

1. Wrap the scallops with the serrano, using the warmth of your fingers to gently press the ham in place. Do not use a toothpick, since the fat in the serrano will facilitate adhesion to the scallops. Place in the refrigerator while you prep the rest of the ingredients.

2. Remove the corn from the cob. In a small saucepan, heat the butter over medium heat and add the onion, corn, sugar, turmeric and salt. Cook for about two or three minutes. Add the bay leaf, the celery, the water and the cobs into the saucepan. Cook for about ten minutes, until the water has reduced by half, but before the corn has fallen apart or disintegrated.

3. Remove the sauce from the stove. Discard the bay leaf, celery and cobs. Allow the mixture to cool for a few minutes. Add the corn and the onions into a blender. Progressively add small amounts of the remaining liquid into the blender, pureeing in between additions until reaching the consistency of a creamy sauce. You might not have to use all of the water.

4. Pass the yellow corn sauce through a sieve if necessary. Set aside to continue to cool
.
corn_pico_de_gallo.JPG
Corn pico de gallo
5. For the corn pico de gallo, in a small bowl, combine the sweet yellow corn, chives and jalapeño. If you are serving the dish later on in the day, add the olive oil and salt immediately prior to when it will be served. Stir. If you are feeling extravagant, you can replace the olive oil for half olive oil and half truffle oil.

black_trumpet_mushrooms.JPG
Black trumpet mushrooms
4. For the black trumpet mushrooms, place the sherry in a small saucepan. Heat over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and cook until the alcohol has evaporated and the mushrooms have absorbed the flavor of the sherry. Also set aside.

5. To cook the scallops, heat a pan over medium heat. Add the butter and, once warmed, add the scallops. Do not season the scallops with salt, since the ham is already very salty. Cook about three minutes on each side, until the scallops have reached a golden brown color. Occasionally, use a spoon to baste the scallops with the melted butter. To check for doneness, press on the center of the scallop. If they feel slightly firm, they are ready.

6. To serve, spoon the yellow corn sauce in each plate. Add the pico de gallo in the center. Sprinkle the sides with the black trumpet mushrooms. Place two scallops in each plate, top with the micro celery, and enjoy warm.

Click here to view the original article on MiamiNewTimes.com

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